Browsing articles in "Technical Tips"
Jul
25

AWS Innovate Online Conference

By david  //  Technical Tips  //  Comments Off on AWS Innovate Online Conference

The online presentations were high-level, but still interesting

May
29

Alexa Observations, part 2

By david  //  Technical Tips  //  Comments Off on Alexa Observations, part 2

In the first post, the address slot type (AMAZON.PostalAddress) was shown in the Alexa Simulator as being populated with 5750 claude drive as a valid address entry to be sent to the Skill. This indicates the Simulator had a small bug in it that has since been corrected by Amazon. For all other numeric data slots, the numbers have to be spelled out with words.
For example, zip codes have to be entered as seven five zero zero one instead of 75001.
The house number should have been required to be spelled out as five seven five zero instead of 5750.

New Method in Address Slot (corrected)

Old Method (with bug)

address_bubble

 

Mar
22

Alexa Observations

By david  //  Technical Tips  //  Comments Off on Alexa Observations

These are some simple observations I made while testing Alexa Skills under development.

For address slot types, the simulator requires complete street types such as spelling out “drive” or “circle”. Acronyms are not accepted. The first grey bubble shows that the simulator stops and does not send a request.

address_bubble

 

If an empty bubble appears in the simulator, then your program returned a JSON with an empty outputSpeech parameter to Alexa:


alexa_empty_text_bubble

 

When you click on “Return to the developer console” before a session has ended, it may be buffered and sent as the first request to the skill’s code during the next session. An indicator of that occurring will be the “audio response only” bubble at the beginning of the next session:

buffered_sessionendedrequest

 

Feb
7

Thanks – “Designing Multimodal Skills for Alexa presentation”

By david  //  Technical Tips  //  Comments Off on Thanks – “Designing Multimodal Skills for Alexa presentation”

Feb
2

FirstButton Installer

By david  //  Technical Tips  //  Comments Off on FirstButton Installer

FirstButton 1.60 has been released at liquiditylighthouse.com.

FirstButton will install a toolbar button on the legacy desktop Internet Explorer browser.

The Installer for this blog is now available for download at: download deylogo.exe here

Source code is located on github at: github.com/FirstButton/FirstButton

 

Feb
1

Basic Composer Commands

By david  //  Technical Tips  //  Comments Off on Basic Composer Commands

Log on to SSH for your linux host, and enter the following commands.

– to show the version of composer-managed packages:
php composer.phar show

– to update all installed vendor products on the server:
php composer.phar update
(All Vendor Software will then be updated by Composer.)

Manually version number of package required in composer.json, if a specific version is needed.

– to update just one installed product on the server:
php composer.phar update product/product-php
(One Vendor Product will be updated using software stored at github.)

Jan
29

FirstButton 1.60 Released – Liquidity Lighthouse

By david  //  Technical Tips  //  Comments Off on FirstButton 1.60 Released – Liquidity Lighthouse

Jan
21

Thanks for Alexa Dev Day Dallas (Aug 1, 2017)

By david  //  Technical Tips  //  Comments Off on Thanks for Alexa Dev Day Dallas (Aug 1, 2017)

Mar
19

Update – preventing Windows 10 upgrade

By david  //  Technical Tips  //  Comments Off on Update – preventing Windows 10 upgrade

This is an update to the earlier post on how to prevent Windows from constantly offering to upgrade to Windows 10.

The batch uninstallers have been modified to perform quiet uninstallations. Only a prompt to restart/reboot the system should be displayed at the end.

Many Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 users will want to keep their current operating system.
To disable the Windows 10 update notifications, follow these steps.
For a permanent disabling, follow steps 1, 2, and 3.
To leave open the possibility of a future OS upgrade, follow steps 1 and 3, skipping step 2.

1)  Uninstall the following updates through Windows Update, if they have already been downloaded.

For Windows 8.1:
Run these individual batch files (Administrator rights may be required), or run the Remove All file to remove all at once.
A reboot may be prompted after the KB’s have uninstalled.

Remove All of these KBs, or
 
Remove KB3173040
 
Remove KB3150513
 
Remove KB3123862
 
Remove KB3035583
 
Remove KB2976978

Information on KB3173040    Information on KB3150513    Information on KB3123862

Information on KB3035583    Information on KB2976978

 

For Windows 7:
Run these 2 batch files (Administrator rights may be required).
A reboot may be prompted after the KB’s is uninstalled.

Remove All of these KBs, or
 
Remove KB3173040
 
Remove KB3150513
 
Remove KB3123862
 
Remove KB3035583
 
Remove KB2952664

Information on KB3173040    Information on KB3150513    Information on KB3123862

Information on KB3035583    Information on KB2952664

 

2)  Apply either group policy updates, or 2 registry updates recommended by Microsoft.
(Download the registry updates hereRegistry Update File)

Microsoft has details of the registry changes here: KB3080351

Keys:
Subkey: HKLM\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate
DWORD value: DisableOSUpgrade = 1

Subkey: HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\WindowsUpdate\OSUpgrade
DWORD value: ReservationsAllowed = 0

 

3)  Manually hide updates KB3123862, KB3035583, KB2976978, KB2952664 using the Control Panel.

Hiding Instructions from sevenforums.com
 

 

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